2017-18 Calendar

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Course Descriptions


Physics

For courses numbered 100 or higher, the prerequisite(s) may be waived by the Physics and Astronomy department. See prerequisite waiver.

For courses numbered less than 100, the prerequisite(s) may be waived by the Adult Academic and Career Preparation department. See prerequisite waiver.


PHYS 075-40 hours
Topics in Physics

Topics in Physics may inclue, but are not limited to, the scientific method, scientific knowledge and social issues, vectors, mechanics, kinematics, dynamics, statics, energy, work, power, electricity, waves, and electrormagnetism.


PHYS 085-40 hours
Topics in Physics

Topics in Physics may inclue, but are not limited to, the scientific method, scientific knowledge and social issues, vectors, mechanics, kinematics, dynamics, statics, energy, work, power, electricity, waves, and electrormagnetism.

Prerequisites:

  • ABE MATH 0851 or MATH 0101 or ABE IALG 0111 or Principles of Mathematics 102 or Introductory Algebra 112
    or the corequisite of ABE ENGL 011 or the corequisite of ABE COMP 011 or English 11

Corequisites:

  • ABE ENGL 080
1 minimum grade of 60 required
2 minimum score of 60 required

PHYS 095-40 hours
Topics in Physics

Topics in Physics may inclue, but are not limited to, the scientific method, scientific knowledge and social issues, vectors, mechanics, kinematics, dynamics, statics, energy, work, power, electricity, waves, and electrormagnetism.

Prerequisites:

  • ABE PHYS 0111

Corequisites:

  • ABE MATH 011
1 minimum grade of 60 required

PHYS 011-112 hours
Physics 011

This course is an algebra-based introduction to physics. The basic concepts of Physics in the areas of kinematics, dynamics, energy, work, power and electricity will be studied. Selected concepts will be investigated experimentally and the scientific method will be developed. A laboratory component is included.

Prerequisites:

  • ABE MATH 0851 or ABE IALG 0111 or Principles of Mathematics 102 or Introductory Algebra 112 or Pre-Calculus 102
  • ABE ENGL 0701 or ABE ENGL 0711 or ABE ENGL 0721 or a minimum ABLE test score of 68/80 and an Advanced Level writing sample
1 minimum grade of 60 required
2 minimum score of 60 required

PHYS 012-96 hours
Physics 012

This course is algebra-based. The basic concepts introduced in Physics 011 will be expanded. The areas of study will be vector kinematics, dynamics, statics, momentum, wave topics and electromagnetism. Selected concepts will be investigated experimentally and the scientific method will be further developed. A laboratory component is included.

Prerequisites:

  • ABE PHYS 0111 or Physics 112

Corequisites:

  • ABE MATH 011
1 minimum grade of 60 required
2 minimum score of 60 required

PHYS 111-3-6
Calculus-Based Physics I

A calculus-based introduction to mechanics for students who intend to pursue careers in the physical sciences (e.g. physics, chemistry, astronomy, mathematics) or engineering. Topics covered include: Newtonian mechanics; translational and rotational kinematics and dynamics, momentum and energy conservation principles; transformations between reference frames; and a brief introduction to special relativity. In any centre where PHYS 112 is not offered, PHYS 111 shall have, in addition to the three lecture hours and the three lab hours, a one-hour seminar. (3,3,0)

Prerequisites:

  • MATH 120 or ABE MATH 0121 or Principles of Math 122 or Pre-Calculus 122
  • ABE PHYS 012 or Physics 12 or ABE PHYS 0113 or Physics 114

Corequisites:

  • MATH 112
1 minimum grade of 67 required
2 minimum score of 67 required
3 minimum grade of 73 required
4 minimum score of 73 required

PHYS 112-3-7
Introductory Physics I

This course is an algebra-based introduction to Physics. This course is generally for students of the life sciences or others who do not plan to pursue careers in the physical sciences or engineering. This course studies the basic concepts of physics in the areas of mechanics, fluids, waves and modern physics. Topics include particle kinematics and dynamics, work and energy, momentum, gravitation and satellite motion, simple harmonic motion and sound, fluid statics and dynamics, and topics in modern physics. Some important concepts will be investigated experimentally to reinforce the concepts and to develop the experimental method of investigating and reporting results. (4,3,0)

Prerequisites:

  • MATH 120 or ABE MATH 012 or Pre-Calculus 12 or Principles of Math 12
  • Physics 11 or ABE PHYS 11 strongly recommended

PHYS 117-3-5.5
Physics for Analytical Chemistry Technology

This course introduces Newtonian mechanics including both kinematics and dynamics, heat, waves, optics, basic electricity, and fluids. Topics will be discussed with special reference to application in the field of instrumentation and electronics for the Analytical Chemistry Technology program. Laboratory experiments (three hours every second week) will be completed to expand on the topics covered in the lectures and will emphasize data acquisition and analysis using computers. (4,1.5,0)

Prerequisites:

  • admission to the Analytical Chemistry Technology diploma program

PHYS 121-3-6
Calculus-Based Physics II

An introductory survey of electricity, magnetism and light: electrostatics, electric fields, capacitance, potential, currents, resistance, electric circuits, magnetic forces, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, alternating currents; waves and light, interference and diffraction. Experimental laboratory investigations in electricity, magnetism and light, and consideration of numerical problems and special topics are included. In any centre where PHYS 122 is not offered, PHYS 121 shall have, in addition to the three lecture hours and the three lab hours, a one-hour seminar. (3,3,0)

Prerequisites:

  • PHYS 111 or PHYS 112 with permission of the department

Corequisites:

  • MATH 122

PHYS 122-3-7
Introductory Physics II

An algebra-based introduction to physics. This course is generally for students of the life sciences or others who do not intend to pursue careers in the physical sciences or engineering. This course is a study of the basic concepts of physics in the areas of electricity, magnetism, physical optics and special relativity. Topics include electrostatics, electric currents, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic forces and fields, electromagnetic induction, alternating current, waves and light, interference, diffraction and special relativity. Experimental laboratory investigations in electricity, magnetism and light and consideration of numerical problems and special topics are included. (4,3,0)

Prerequisites:

  • PHYS 112 or PHYS 111

PHYS 125-3-5.5
Physics for Electronic Engineering Technology

An introduction to Newtonian mechanics, fluid dynamics, heat, waves, optics, acoustics and electromagnetic radiation. Topics will be discussed with special reference to application in the field of electronics. Laboratory experiments (three hours every second week) will be completed to expand on the topics covered in the course work. (4,1.5,0)

Prerequisites:

  • ABE PHYS 011
    or Physics 11; and MATH 147

PHYS 130-3-3
Physics for Future Leaders

This course examines the physics underlying major technological aspects of modern society and issues of global concern. It will address themes such as global warming, the energy problem and alternative sources of energy, nuclear power and nuclear weapons, health and medical technology, pollution of the atmosphere, satellites, telecommunication, and the internet. This course is meant for future leaders in business, politics, arts, and science. This course requires no scientific or mathematical background and is accessible to students in any discipline. (3,0,0)


PHYS 200-3-4
Relativity and Modern Physics

Special relativity: Lorentz transformation, dynamics and conservation laws. Quantum physics: the experimental evidence for quantization; a qualitative discussion of the concepts of quantum mechanics and their application to simple systems of atoms and nuclei. (3,0,1)

Prerequisites:

  • PHYS 122 or PHYS 121
  • MATH 122

PHYS 202-3-4
Engineering Mechanics I

This course begins with a review of vector algebra and continues with forces, moments, conditions of equilibrium and application to particles and rigid bodies. Analysis of statically determinate structures including beams, trusses and arches using free body diagrams (FBD) will be covered. The kinematics component will include rectilinear and curvilinear motion, and the dynamics component will include Newton's second law, dry friction, impulse, momentum, work and energy.
Although exceptional students may do the course in their first year, it is strongly recommended that they wait until second year after PHYS 111 and MATH 112 and 122 are complete before attempting this course. (3,0,1)

Prerequisites:

  • ABE PHYS 012 or Physics 12

Corequisites:

  • PHYS 111 and MATH 112

PHYS 215-3-3
Thermodynamics

Thermodynamics at an intermediate level. Topics include temperature, heat and work, the First Law, heat transfer, heat engines, entropy and the Second Law. (3,0,0)

Prerequisites:

  • PHYS 121 or PHYS 1121 and PHYS 1221 or admission to the OC Electronic Engineering Technology Bridge to UBCO Electrical Engineering
1 minimum grade of 68 required

PHYS 219-3-4
Methods of Measurement I

This course covers basic laboratory techniques with emphasis on the use of computers in the collection and analysis of data. The student will be expected to write basic computer programs to allow interface boards to collect data. The course will use various transducers to measure physical quantities such as temperature, sound, velocity and acceleration, pressure and magnetic field. Spread sheets for the analysis of data and word processors for the preparation of formal reports are used. The construction of basic equipment will be encouraged. Technical writing of reports is emphasized. (0,3,1)

Prerequisites:

  • MATH 122
  • PHYS 121 or PHYS 122

PHYS 220-3-3
Environmental Physics

This course examines contemporary environmental issues, focussing on the Physics of climate modification, ozone depletion, energy sources for electrical generation, energy storage, energy conservation strategies, transportation, pollutant transport, non-ionizing radiation, risk analysis, and other current topics of interest. This course is also offered as EESC 220. Students with credit for BIOL 290 or EESC 220 cannot take PHYS 220 for further credit. (3,0,0)

Prerequisites:

  • MATH 122
  • PHYS 121 or PHYS 1221
  • second-year standing
  • a first-year course(s) in BIOL, CHEM, EESC, and/or GEOG would be useful but is (are) not required.
1 minimum grade of 60 required

PHYS 225-3-3
Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism

Electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric potential, DC circuits, conduction models, strain gauges, RTD, circuit analysis theorems, magnetic fields, Hall effect, Ampere's law, Faraday's law, inductance, and semiconductors with basic applications. (3,0,0)

Prerequisites:

  • MATH 122
  • PHYS 121 or PHYS 1121 and PHYS 1221
1 minimum grade of 68 required

PHYS 227-3-4
Instrumentation Physics for Analytical Chemistry Technology(ACT)

This course covers basic laboratory techniques with emphasis on process control instrumentation and the use of computers in the collection and analysis of data. This course will provide an introduction to analogue and digital signals, data acquisition, signal conditioning, measurement theory, instrument calibration and process control loops. Students will be expected to use spreadsheets for the analysis of data and word processors for the preparation of formal reports. Technical writing of reports will be emphasized. (2,2,0)

Prerequisites:

  • COSC 171
  • MATH 136
  • PHYS 117

PHYS 228-3-4
Classical Mechanics

Classical mechanics at an intermediate level in inertial and non-inertial reference frames. (3,0,1)

Prerequisites:

  • MATH 122
  • PHYS 121 or PHYS 1121 and PHYS 1221

Corequisites:

  • MATH 225
1 minimum grade of 68 required

PHYS 229-3-4
Methods of Measurement II

A continuation of the PHYS 219 laboratory course. Experiments will be selected from appropriate areas of physics to complement the other physics courses currently taken by the students enrolled. Experiments from other scientific disciplines may be included if enrollment warrants. Emphasis will be on the use of computers as a tool in collecting, analyzing and reporting data. Topics include transducers, interfacing, statistical data analysis, curve fitting and report writing. Programming related to the collection of data is included. Software packages related to the above topics are used. (0,3,1)

Prerequisites:

  • PHYS 219

PHYS 240-3-3
Introduction to Biophysics

This course presents an analysis of biological systems from a physicist's perspective and provides science students with some understanding of the physics underlying biological phenomena, and a deeper appreciation of the range of application of simple physical principles. Topics include form and size in plants and animals, strength and energy storage in structural elements, thermal regulation, fluid motion within organisms, life in fluids, and topics in molecular physics. This course is also offered as BIOL 240. Students with credit for BIOL 240 cannot take PHYS 240 for further credit. (3,0,0)

Prerequisites:

  • MATH 122
  • PHYS 121 or PHYS 1221
  • second-year standing
  • BIOL 121, or both BIOL 112 and BIOL 122, would be useful but is not required
1 minimum grade of 60 required


Sample Course Description - Credit Based

Sample Course Description - Hours Based

Not all centres offer all courses listed in the calendar and courses may vary each semester. Contact your local Okanagan College campus for up-to-date course offerings. 

Definitions for understanding course descriptions

Concurrent Registration: Compulsory registration for credit (audit registration is specifically precluded) in two or more courses at the same time even though one or more of the courses may have been previously successfully completed.

Corequisite: A course required to be taken at the same time as another course (audit registration is precluded) unless the course has been successfully completed before.

Prerequisite: A course that must be successfully completed before registration in a given course. Courses without a prerequisite statement indicate that no prerequisite is required for enrolment.

Second-year Standing: Second-year standing requires successful completion of a minimum of 24 credits at the 100 level or above.

Third-year Standing: Students will be granted third-year standing after completing 48 credits towards a diploma or degree program.

Fourth-year Standing: Students will be granted fourth-year standing after completing 78 credits towards a degree program.

Prerequisite Waiver: Students who wish to have the course prerequisite waived, as indicated in this calendar, must receive permission from the department offering the course. A prerequisite waiver form must be signed by the department and forwarded to the Registrar's Office.

Credit: A credit is an assigned unit of value granted for successful completion of a course, which are used for diploma, and degree graduation requirements and/or transfer credit to another institution.

Elective: A course freely chosen from a restricted list of all Okanagan College courses, which is used to fulfill credit requirements in addition to the courses specified in the program outline.

First-year Student (associate degree and diploma programs): A student who meets the admission requirements for a specific program; has applied and been formally admitted to that program; is registered in one or more courses which are identified as constituting the first-year requirements of that particular program; and has completed fewer than 80% of the credits or hours toward the first-year requirements of that program.

Second-year Student (associate degree and diploma programs): A student who meets the entrance requirements for a specific program; has applied and been formally admitted to that program; is registered in one or more of the courses which are identified as constituting the first-year or second-year requirements of that particular program; and has completed 80% or more of the credits or hours towards the first-year requirements of that program.

Full Course Load: For degree programs (years one to four), 15 credits per semester. For diploma and vocational programs, all courses listed in the program outline in this calendar on a semester basis.

Full-time Enrolment:

  • Associate of Arts or Associate of Science: nine credits 
  • Adult Academic and Career Preparation: three or more courses or 15 hours of instruction per week.
  • International Education: one ESL course
  • Business Administration diploma program: four or more courses
  • Business Administration certificate programs: four or more courses
  • Civil Engineering Technology: five or more courses
  • Computer Information Systems: four or more courses
  • Electronic Engineering Technology: five or more courses
  • Water Engineering Technology: five or more courses

This definition is for statistical and registration purposes only. Financial Aid recipients must comply with definitions required by Federal and Provincial guidelines.

Part-time Enrolment: Enrolment in any number of courses that is less than that indicated under the definition for Full-time Enrolment.

Registered Student: A registered student is one who has completed the admission and registration procedure and who has paid or made appropriate arrangements to pay the required fees.

Transfer Credit: Credit given by an institution for work successfully completed at a different institution.

University Transfer: Credit programs of study, generally arts and science courses, which are transferable toward degree programs at Okanagan College and other institutions.

Letter of Permission: A document issued by a dean which permits an Okanagan College student to take one or more courses at another institution to be used for credit toward an Okanagan College degree or diploma.

Transferability of Okanagan College courses: Students planning on transferring Okanagan College courses to another institution are encouraged to check the calendar of the institution to which they plan to transfer to determine the amount of transfer credit permitted in any chosen program.

Students should visit the online transfer guide at http://www.bctransferguide.ca/ for complete transfer information.

Sustainabilty and Courses at Okanagan College

Sustainability “incorporates economic and social change to protect the natural systems of the planet, so that current and future generations may maintain or improve their quality of life.”
                Sustainability definition, Okanagan College Strategic Plan 2010-2015
 
Sustainability-focused courses either concentrate on the concept of sustainability, including its social, economic, and environmental dimensions, or examine an issue or topic using sustainability as a lens.
 
Sustainability-related courses incorporate sustainability as a distinct course component or module or concentrate on a single sustainability principle or issue.

Okanagan College Calendar: Printed 11/18/2017