2017-18 Calendar

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Course Descriptions


Astronomy

Prerequisites may be waived by the Physics and Astronomy department. See prerequisite waiver.


ASTR 110-3-5.5
Astronomy for the Physical Sciences I

with laboratory component

This course is for students entering the physical sciences or engineering and is an introduction to contemporary astronomy emphasizing the solar system. This course begins with topics in physics used by astronomers which include general principles of the celestial sphere, laws of motion, light and optics. Observational techniques using earth-based telescopes, artificial satellites and inter-planetary probes will be discussed. The second part of the course is an examination of the planets, moons and smaller bodies in our solar system. Throughout the course historical perspectives will be added. Students may have the opportunity for some observational work. This course has a three-hour bi-weekly laboratory and satisfies the three credits of science lab requirement for graduation in Arts. The one-hour seminar will cover mathematical astrophysics.

(Credit will only be granted for one of ASTR 110, 111 or 112.)

A three-hour lab is offered on alternate weeks. (3,1.5,1)

Prerequisites:

  • ABE MATH 012 or Pre-Calculus 12
  • ABE PHYS 011 or Physics 11

ASTR 111-3-4.5
Astronomy I

with laboratory component

This course is an introduction to contemporary astronomy emphasizing the solar system and begins with topics in physics used by astronomers including general principles of the celestial sphere, laws of motion, light and optics. Observational techniques using earth-based telescopes, artificial satellites and interplanetary probes will be discussed. The second part of the course is a detailed examination of the planets, moons and smaller bodies in our solar system. Throughout the course historical perspectives will be added. Students may have the opportunity for some observational work. This course has a three-hour bi-weekly laboratory and satisfies the three credits of the science lab requirement for graduation in Arts.

(Credit will only be granted for one of ASTR 110, 111 or 112.) (3,1.5,0)

Prerequisites:

  • Mathematics 11 is strongly recommended

ASTR 112-3-3
Astronomy I

without laboratory component

This course is an introduction to contemporary astronomy emphasizing the solar system and begins with topics in physics used by astronomers including general principles of the celestial sphere, laws of motion, light and optics. Observational techniques using earth-based telescopes, artificial satellites and interplanetary probes will be discussed. The second part of the course will examine the planets, moon and smaller bodies in our solar system. Throughout the course historical perspectives will be added. This course does not satisfy the science lab requirement for graduation in Arts. Science students cannot use this course for science credit towards their degree.
(Credit will only be granted for one of ASTR 110, 111 or 112.) (3,0,0)

Prerequisites:

  • a minimum of 50% in any of Pre-calculus Grade 11, Foundations of Mathematics Grade 11, or Apprenticeship and Workplace Mathematics Grade 11 is strong recommended.

ASTR 120-3-5.5
Astronomy for the Physical Sciences II

with laboratory component

This course is for students entering the physical sciences or engineering and is an introduction to contemporary astronomy emphasizing modern stellar, galactic and extragalactic astronomy. Topics include stars and stellar evolution from protostars to black holes; galaxies, clusters of galaxies and quasars; the large-scale structure of the universe and cosmology. Special and general relativity are discussed in an elementary fashion. Throughout the course historical perspectives will be added. Students may have the opportunity for some observational work. This course has a three-hour bi-weekly laboratory and satisfies three credits of the science lab requirement for graduation in Arts. The one-hour seminar will cover mathematical astrophysics. (Credit will only be granted for one of ASTR 120, 121 or 122.) (3,1.5,1)

Prerequisites:

  • ASTR 110

ASTR 121-3-4.5
Astronomy II

with laboratory component

This course is an introduction to contemporary astronomy emphasizing modern stellar, galactic and extragalactic astronomy. Topics include stars and stellar evolution from protostars to black holes; galaxies, clusters of galaxies and quasars; the large-scale structure of the universe and cosmology. Special and general relativity are discussed in an elementary fashion. Throughout the course historical perspectives will be added. Students may have the opportunity for some observational work. This course has a three-hour bi-weekly laboratory and satisfies three credits of the science lab requirement for graduation in Arts.

(Credit will only be granted for one of ASTR 120, 121 or 122.) (3,1.5,0)

Prerequisites:

  • Mathematics 11 and ASTR 111 or 110 are strongly recommended

ASTR 122-3-3
Astronomy II

without laboratory component

This course is an introduction to contemporary astronomy emphasizing modern stellar, galactic and extragalactic astronomy. Topics include stars and stellar evolution from protostars to black holes; galaxies, clusters of galaxies and quasars; the large-scale structure of the universe and cosmology. Special and general relativity are discussed in an elementary fashion. Throughout the course historical perspectives will be added. There is no laboratory with this course and this course does not satisfy the science lab requirement for graduation in Arts. Science students cannot use this course for science credit towards their degree.

(Credit will only be granted for one of ASTR 120, 121 or 122.) (3,0,0)

Prerequisites:

  • a minimum of 50% in any of Pre-calculus Grade 11, Foundations of Mathematics Grade 11, or Apprenticeship and Workplace Mathematics Grade 11 is strong recommended. A minimum of 50% in one of ASTR 110, 111, 112 is also recommended.

ASTR 220-3-3
Astrobiology

In this course, students will address the three great questions of astrobiology: Where do we come from? Where are we going? Are we alone in the Universe? We now have the framework and technological tools to grapple with these ancient questions scientifically. The Copernican and Darwinian revolutions forever altered our view of Earth's place in the solar system and role in sustaining and promoting life. The discovery of planets beyond our solar system and the discovery of life in extreme environments on Earth have greatly expanded our understanding of habitable zones in the Universe. Students will use the disciplines of astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology and physics in a truly interdisciplinary way to examine the conditions required for the evolution of life in the Universe. (3,0,0)

Prerequisites:

  • second-year standing

ASTR 230-3-3
History of the Universe

This course traces the evolution of rational cosmology from the ancient Greeks to the present day. There are no specific mathematics and physics prerequisites, but students must have second-year standing. This course may be taken by Science and non-Science students. (3,0,0)

Prerequisites:

  • second-year standing


Sample Course Description - Credit Based

Sample Course Description - Hours Based

Not all centres offer all courses listed in the calendar and courses may vary each semester. Contact your local Okanagan College campus for up-to-date course offerings. 

Definitions for understanding course descriptions

Concurrent Registration: Compulsory registration for credit (audit registration is specifically precluded) in two or more courses at the same time even though one or more of the courses may have been previously successfully completed.

Corequisite: A course required to be taken at the same time as another course (audit registration is precluded) unless the course has been successfully completed before.

Prerequisite: A course that must be successfully completed before registration in a given course. Courses without a prerequisite statement indicate that no prerequisite is required for enrolment.

Second-year Standing: Second-year standing requires successful completion of a minimum of 24 credits at the 100 level or above.

Third-year Standing: Students will be granted third-year standing after completing 48 credits towards a diploma or degree program.

Fourth-year Standing: Students will be granted fourth-year standing after completing 78 credits towards a degree program.

Prerequisite Waiver: Students who wish to have the course prerequisite waived, as indicated in this calendar, must receive permission from the department offering the course. A prerequisite waiver form must be signed by the department and forwarded to the Registrar's Office.

Credit: A credit is an assigned unit of value granted for successful completion of a course, which are used for diploma, and degree graduation requirements and/or transfer credit to another institution.

Elective: A course freely chosen from a restricted list of all Okanagan College courses, which is used to fulfill credit requirements in addition to the courses specified in the program outline.

First-year Student (associate degree and diploma programs): A student who meets the admission requirements for a specific program; has applied and been formally admitted to that program; is registered in one or more courses which are identified as constituting the first-year requirements of that particular program; and has completed fewer than 80% of the credits or hours toward the first-year requirements of that program.

Second-year Student (associate degree and diploma programs): A student who meets the entrance requirements for a specific program; has applied and been formally admitted to that program; is registered in one or more of the courses which are identified as constituting the first-year or second-year requirements of that particular program; and has completed 80% or more of the credits or hours towards the first-year requirements of that program.

Full Course Load: For degree programs (years one to four), 15 credits per semester. For diploma and vocational programs, all courses listed in the program outline in this calendar on a semester basis.

Full-time Enrolment:

  • Associate of Arts or Associate of Science: nine credits 
  • Adult Academic and Career Preparation: three or more courses or 15 hours of instruction per week.
  • International Education: one ESL course
  • Business Administration diploma program: four or more courses
  • Business Administration certificate programs: four or more courses
  • Civil Engineering Technology: five or more courses
  • Computer Information Systems: four or more courses
  • Electronic Engineering Technology: five or more courses
  • Water Engineering Technology: five or more courses

This definition is for statistical and registration purposes only. Financial Aid recipients must comply with definitions required by Federal and Provincial guidelines.

Part-time Enrolment: Enrolment in any number of courses that is less than that indicated under the definition for Full-time Enrolment.

Registered Student: A registered student is one who has completed the admission and registration procedure and who has paid or made appropriate arrangements to pay the required fees.

Transfer Credit: Credit given by an institution for work successfully completed at a different institution.

University Transfer: Credit programs of study, generally arts and science courses, which are transferable toward degree programs at Okanagan College and other institutions.

Letter of Permission: A document issued by a dean which permits an Okanagan College student to take one or more courses at another institution to be used for credit toward an Okanagan College degree or diploma.

Transferability of Okanagan College courses: Students planning on transferring Okanagan College courses to another institution are encouraged to check the calendar of the institution to which they plan to transfer to determine the amount of transfer credit permitted in any chosen program.

Students should visit the online transfer guide at http://www.bctransferguide.ca/ for complete transfer information.

Sustainabilty and Courses at Okanagan College

Sustainability “incorporates economic and social change to protect the natural systems of the planet, so that current and future generations may maintain or improve their quality of life.”
                Sustainability definition, Okanagan College Strategic Plan 2010-2015
 
Sustainability-focused courses either concentrate on the concept of sustainability, including its social, economic, and environmental dimensions, or examine an issue or topic using sustainability as a lens.
 
Sustainability-related courses incorporate sustainability as a distinct course component or module or concentrate on a single sustainability principle or issue.

Okanagan College Calendar: Printed 11/18/2017